1mxl

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1mxl, 40 NMR models ()
Ligands:
Resources: FirstGlance, OCA, RCSB, PDBsum
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Contents

STRUCTURE OF CARDIAC TROPONIN C-TROPONIN I COMPLEX

Publication Abstract from PubMed

The interaction of troponin-C (TnC) with troponin-I (TnI) plays a central role in skeletal and cardiac muscle contraction. We have recently shown that the binding of Ca2+ to cardiac TnC (cTnC) does not induce an "opening" of the regulatory domain in order to interact with cTnI [Sia, S. K., et al. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 18216-18221; Spyracopoulos et al. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 12138-12146], which is in contrast to the regulatory N-domain of skeletal TnC (sTnC). This implies that the mode of interaction between cTnC and cTnI may be different than that between sTnC and sTnI. In sTnI, a region downstream from the inhibitory region (residues 115-131) has been shown to bind the exposed hydrophobic pocket of Ca2+-saturated sNTnC [McKay, R. T., et al. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 28494-28500]. The present study demonstrates that the corresponding region in cTnI (residues 147-163) binds to the regulatory domain of cTnC only in the Ca2+-saturated state to form a 1:1 complex, with an affinity approximately six times weaker than that between the skeletal counterparts. Thus, while Ca2+ does not cause opening, it is required for muscle regulation. The solution structure of the cNTnC.Ca2+.cTnI147-163 complex has been determined by multinuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. The structure reveals an open conformation for cNTnC, similar to that of Ca2+-saturated sNTnC. The bound peptide adopts a alpha-helical conformation spanning residues 150-157. The C-terminus of the peptide is unstructured. The open conformation for Ca2+-saturated cNTnC in the presence of cTnI (residues 147-163) accommodates hydrophobic interactions between side chains of the peptide and side chains at the interface of A and B helices of cNTnC. Thus the mechanistic differences between the regulation of cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction can be understood in terms of different thermodynamics and kinetics equilibria between essentially the same structure states.

Binding of cardiac troponin-I147-163 induces a structural opening in human cardiac troponin-C., Li MX, Spyracopoulos L, Sykes BD, Biochemistry. 1999 Jun 29;38(26):8289-98. PMID:10387074

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Disease

[TNNC1_HUMAN] Defects in TNNC1 are the cause of cardiomyopathy dilated type 1Z (CMD1Z) [MIM:611879]. Dilated cardiomyopathy is a disorder characterized by ventricular dilation and impaired systolic function, resulting in congestive heart failure and arrhythmia. Patients are at risk of premature death.[1] Defects in TNNC1 are the cause of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy type 13 (CMH13) [MIM:613243]. A hereditary heart disorder characterized by ventricular hypertrophy, which is usually asymmetric and often involves the interventricular septum. The symptoms include dyspnea, syncope, collapse, palpitations, and chest pain. They can be readily provoked by exercise. The disorder has inter- and intrafamilial variability ranging from benign to malignant forms with high risk of cardiac failure and sudden cardiac death.[2][3][4][5] [TNNI3_HUMAN] Defects in TNNI3 are the cause of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy type 7 (CMH7) [MIM:613690]. Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a hereditary heart disorder characterized by ventricular hypertrophy, which is usually asymmetric and often involves the interventricular septum. The symptoms include dyspnea, syncope, collapse, palpitations, and chest pain. They can be readily provoked by exercise. The disorder has inter- and intrafamilial variability ranging from benign to malignant forms with high risk of cardiac failure and sudden cardiac death.[6][7][8][9][10] Defects in TNNI3 are the cause of familial restrictive cardiomyopathy type 1 (RCM1) [MIM:115210]. RCM1 is a heart muscle disorder characterized by impaired filling of the ventricles with reduced diastolic volume, in the presence of normal or near normal wall thickness and systolic function.[11] Defects in TNNI3 are the cause of cardiomyopathy dilated type 2A (CMD2A) [MIM:611880]. Dilated cardiomyopathy is a disorder characterized by ventricular dilation and impaired systolic function, resulting in congestive heart failure and arrhythmia. Patients are at risk of premature death.[12] Defects in TNNI3 are the cause of cardiomyopathy dilated type 1FF (CMD1FF) [MIM:613286]. Dilated cardiomyopathy is a disorder characterized by ventricular dilation and impaired systolic function, resulting in congestive heart failure and arrhythmia. Patients are at risk of premature death.

Function

[TNNC1_HUMAN] Troponin is the central regulatory protein of striated muscle contraction. Tn consists of three components: Tn-I which is the inhibitor of actomyosin ATPase, Tn-T which contains the binding site for tropomyosin and Tn-C. The binding of calcium to Tn-C abolishes the inhibitory action of Tn on actin filaments. [TNNI3_HUMAN] Troponin I is the inhibitory subunit of troponin, the thin filament regulatory complex which confers calcium-sensitivity to striated muscle actomyosin ATPase activity.

About this Structure

1mxl is a 2 chain structure with sequence from Homo sapiens. Full experimental information is available from OCA.

See Also

Reference

  • Li MX, Spyracopoulos L, Sykes BD. Binding of cardiac troponin-I147-163 induces a structural opening in human cardiac troponin-C. Biochemistry. 1999 Jun 29;38(26):8289-98. PMID:10387074 doi:10.1021/bi9901679
  1. Mogensen J, Murphy RT, Shaw T, Bahl A, Redwood C, Watkins H, Burke M, Elliott PM, McKenna WJ. Severe disease expression of cardiac troponin C and T mutations in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2004 Nov 16;44(10):2033-40. PMID:15542288 doi:S0735-1097(04)01700-0
  2. Hoffmann B, Schmidt-Traub H, Perrot A, Osterziel KJ, Gessner R. First mutation in cardiac troponin C, L29Q, in a patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Hum Mutat. 2001 Jun;17(6):524. PMID:11385718 doi:10.1002/humu.1143
  3. Schmidtmann A, Lindow C, Villard S, Heuser A, Mugge A, Gessner R, Granier C, Jaquet K. Cardiac troponin C-L29Q, related to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, hinders the transduction of the protein kinase A dependent phosphorylation signal from cardiac troponin I to C. FEBS J. 2005 Dec;272(23):6087-97. PMID:16302972 doi:10.1111/j.1742-4658.2005.05001.x
  4. Landstrom AP, Parvatiyar MS, Pinto JR, Marquardt ML, Bos JM, Tester DJ, Ommen SR, Potter JD, Ackerman MJ. Molecular and functional characterization of novel hypertrophic cardiomyopathy susceptibility mutations in TNNC1-encoded troponin C. J Mol Cell Cardiol. 2008 Aug;45(2):281-8. doi: 10.1016/j.yjmcc.2008.05.003. Epub , 2008 May 11. PMID:18572189 doi:10.1016/j.yjmcc.2008.05.003
  5. Pinto JR, Parvatiyar MS, Jones MA, Liang J, Ackerman MJ, Potter JD. A functional and structural study of troponin C mutations related to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. J Biol Chem. 2009 Jul 10;284(28):19090-100. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M109.007021. Epub, 2009 May 12. PMID:19439414 doi:10.1074/jbc.M109.007021
  6. Kimura A, Harada H, Park JE, Nishi H, Satoh M, Takahashi M, Hiroi S, Sasaoka T, Ohbuchi N, Nakamura T, Koyanagi T, Hwang TH, Choo JA, Chung KS, Hasegawa A, Nagai R, Okazaki O, Nakamura H, Matsuzaki M, Sakamoto T, Toshima H, Koga Y, Imaizumi T, Sasazuki T. Mutations in the cardiac troponin I gene associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Nat Genet. 1997 Aug;16(4):379-82. PMID:9241277 doi:10.1038/ng0897-379
  7. Niimura H, Patton KK, McKenna WJ, Soults J, Maron BJ, Seidman JG, Seidman CE. Sarcomere protein gene mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy of the elderly. Circulation. 2002 Jan 29;105(4):446-51. PMID:11815426
  8. Richard P, Charron P, Carrier L, Ledeuil C, Cheav T, Pichereau C, Benaiche A, Isnard R, Dubourg O, Burban M, Gueffet JP, Millaire A, Desnos M, Schwartz K, Hainque B, Komajda M. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: distribution of disease genes, spectrum of mutations, and implications for a molecular diagnosis strategy. Circulation. 2003 May 6;107(17):2227-32. Epub 2003 Apr 21. PMID:12707239 doi:10.1161/01.CIR.0000066323.15244.54
  9. Erdmann J, Daehmlow S, Wischke S, Senyuva M, Werner U, Raible J, Tanis N, Dyachenko S, Hummel M, Hetzer R, Regitz-Zagrosek V. Mutation spectrum in a large cohort of unrelated consecutive patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Clin Genet. 2003 Oct;64(4):339-49. PMID:12974739
  10. Ingles J, Doolan A, Chiu C, Seidman J, Seidman C, Semsarian C. Compound and double mutations in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: implications for genetic testing and counselling. J Med Genet. 2005 Oct;42(10):e59. PMID:16199542 doi:10.1136/jmg.2005.033886
  11. Mogensen J, Kubo T, Duque M, Uribe W, Shaw A, Murphy R, Gimeno JR, Elliott P, McKenna WJ. Idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy is part of the clinical expression of cardiac troponin I mutations. J Clin Invest. 2003 Jan;111(2):209-16. PMID:12531876 doi:10.1172/JCI16336
  12. Murphy RT, Mogensen J, Shaw A, Kubo T, Hughes S, McKenna WJ. Novel mutation in cardiac troponin I in recessive idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. Lancet. 2004 Jan 31;363(9406):371-2. PMID:15070570 doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(04)15468-8

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