2jn5

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2jn5, 10 NMR models ()


Resources: FirstGlance, OCA, RCSB, PDBsum
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Contents

Solution Structure of a Dodecapeptide from Alpha-Synuclein Bound with Synphilin-1

Publication Abstract from PubMed

alpha-Synuclein (alpha-Syn) is the major component of Lewy bodies (LBs) deposited in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease. Synphilin-1 (Sph1) is a novel alpha-Syn-interacting protein also present in the LBs. However, the roles of alpha-Syn-Sph1 interaction in LB formation and in the related pathogenesis are still unclear. We have studied the interaction between alpha-Syn and Sph1 by biochemical and structural approaches and found that the central coiled-coil domain of Sph1 specifically interacts with the N-terminal stretch of alpha-Syn. When overexpressed in HEK 293T cells, Sph1 forms inclusions together with alpha-Syn, but the Sph1-positive inclusions cannot recruit the N-terminally truncated alpha-Syn. The central portion of Sph1 can also recruit alpha-Syn and induce inclusion formation through its coiled-coil domain. These observations demonstrate that the alpha-Syn-Sph1 interaction significantly promotes the formation of cytoplasmic alpha-Syn inclusions, which may have implications for LB formation in neural cells. We have also elucidated solution structure of the coiled-coil domain of Sph1 and its interaction with the N-terminal peptide of alpha-Syn. The specific interaction between alpha-Syn and Sph1 provides mechanistic insights into the inclusion-body formation in cells and pathological implication in Parkinson's disease.

Interaction with synphilin-1 promotes inclusion formation of alpha-synuclein: mechanistic insights and pathological implication., Xie YY, Zhou CJ, Zhou ZR, Hong J, Che MX, Fu QS, Song AX, Lin DH, Hu HY, FASEB J. 2010 Jan;24(1):196-205. Epub 2009 Sep 17. PMID:19762560

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Disease

[SYUA_HUMAN] Note=Genetic alterations of SNCA resulting in aberrant polymerization into fibrils, are associated with several neurodegenerative diseases (synucleinopathies). SNCA fibrillar aggregates represent the major non A-beta component of Alzheimer disease amyloid plaque, and a major component of Lewy body inclusions. They are also found within Lewy body (LB)-like intraneuronal inclusions, glial inclusions and axonal spheroids in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation type 1. Defects in SNCA are the cause of Parkinson disease type 1 (PARK1) [MIM:168601]. A complex neurodegenerative disorder characterized by bradykinesia, resting tremor, muscular rigidity and postural instability. Additional features are characteristic postural abnormalities, dysautonomia, dystonic cramps, and dementia. The pathology of Parkinson disease involves the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the presence of Lewy bodies (intraneuronal accumulations of aggregated proteins), in surviving neurons in various areas of the brain. The disease is progressive and usually manifests after the age of 50 years, although early-onset cases (before 50 years) are known. The majority of the cases are sporadic suggesting a multifactorial etiology based on environmental and genetic factors. However, some patients present with a positive family history for the disease. Familial forms of the disease usually begin at earlier ages and are associated with atypical clinical features.[1][2][3] Defects in SNCA are the cause of Parkinson disease type 4 (PARK4) [MIM:605543]. A complex neurodegenerative disorder with manifestations ranging from typical Parkinson disease to dementia with Lewy bodies. Clinical features include parkinsonian symptoms (tremor, rigidity, postural instability and bradykinesia), dementia, diffuse Lewy body pathology, autonomic dysfunction, hallucinations and paranoia. Defects in SNCA are the cause of dementia Lewy body (DLB) [MIM:127750]. A neurodegenerative disorder clinically characterized by mental impairment leading to dementia, parkinsonism, often with fluctuating cognitive function, visual hallucinations, falls, syncopal episodes, and sensitivity to neuroleptic medication. Brainstem or cortical intraneuronal accumulations of aggregated proteins (Lewy bodies) are the only essential pathologic features. Patients may also have hippocampal and neocortical senile plaques, sometimes in sufficient number to fulfill the diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer disease.

Function

[SYUA_HUMAN] May be involved in the regulation of dopamine release and transport. Induces fibrillization of microtubule-associated protein tau. Reduces neuronal responsiveness to various apoptotic stimuli, leading to a decreased caspase-3 activation.

About this Structure

2jn5 is a 1 chain structure. Full experimental information is available from OCA.

Reference

  • Xie YY, Zhou CJ, Zhou ZR, Hong J, Che MX, Fu QS, Song AX, Lin DH, Hu HY. Interaction with synphilin-1 promotes inclusion formation of alpha-synuclein: mechanistic insights and pathological implication. FASEB J. 2010 Jan;24(1):196-205. Epub 2009 Sep 17. PMID:19762560 doi:10.1096/fj.09-133082
  1. Polymeropoulos MH, Lavedan C, Leroy E, Ide SE, Dehejia A, Dutra A, Pike B, Root H, Rubenstein J, Boyer R, Stenroos ES, Chandrasekharappa S, Athanassiadou A, Papapetropoulos T, Johnson WG, Lazzarini AM, Duvoisin RC, Di Iorio G, Golbe LI, Nussbaum RL. Mutation in the alpha-synuclein gene identified in families with Parkinson's disease. Science. 1997 Jun 27;276(5321):2045-7. PMID:9197268
  2. Kruger R, Kuhn W, Muller T, Woitalla D, Graeber M, Kosel S, Przuntek H, Epplen JT, Schols L, Riess O. Ala30Pro mutation in the gene encoding alpha-synuclein in Parkinson's disease. Nat Genet. 1998 Feb;18(2):106-8. PMID:9462735 doi:10.1038/ng0298-106
  3. Zarranz JJ, Alegre J, Gomez-Esteban JC, Lezcano E, Ros R, Ampuero I, Vidal L, Hoenicka J, Rodriguez O, Atares B, Llorens V, Gomez Tortosa E, del Ser T, Munoz DG, de Yebenes JG. The new mutation, E46K, of alpha-synuclein causes Parkinson and Lewy body dementia. Ann Neurol. 2004 Feb;55(2):164-73. PMID:14755719 doi:10.1002/ana.10795

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