First time at Proteopedia? Click on the green links: they change the 3D image. Click and drag the molecules. Proteopedia is a 3D, interactive encyclopedia of proteins, RNA, DNA and other molecules. With a free user account, you can edit pages in Proteopedia. Visit the Main Page to learn more.

2rlp

From Proteopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
2rlp, 30 NMR models ()
Gene: CFH, HF, HF1, HF2 (Homo sapiens)
Related: 2jgx, 2jgw, 2bzm, 2rlq
Resources: FirstGlance, OCA, RCSB, PDBsum
Coordinates: save as pdb, mmCIF, xml


Contents

NMR structure of CCP modules 1-2 of complement factor H

Publication Abstract from PubMed

Factor H is a regulatory glycoprotein of the complement system. We expressed the three N-terminal complement control protein modules of human factor H (FH1-3) and confirmed FH1-3 to be the minimal unit with cofactor activity for C3b proteolysis by factor I. We reconstructed FH1-3 from NMR-derived structures of FH1-2 and FH2-3 revealing an approximately 105-A-long rod-like arrangement of the modules. In structural comparisons with other C3b-engaging proteins, factor H module 3 most closely resembles factor B module 3, consistent with factor H competing with factor B for binding C3b. Factor H modules 1, 2, and 3 each has a similar backbone structure to first, second, and third modules, respectively, of functional sites in decay accelerating factor and complement receptor type 1; the equivalent intermodular tilt and twist angles are also broadly similar. Resemblance between molecular surfaces is closest for first modules but absent in the case of second modules. Substitution of buried Val-62 with Ile (a factor H single nucleotide polymorphism potentially protective for age-related macular degeneration and dense deposit disease) causes rearrangements within the module 1 core and increases thermal stability but does not disturb the interface with module 2. Replacement of partially exposed (in module 1) Arg-53 by His (an atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome-linked mutation) did not impair structural integrity at 37 degrees C, but this FH1-2 mutant was less stable at higher temperatures; furthermore, chemical shift differences indicated potential for small structural changes at the module 1-2 interface.

Structure of the N-terminal region of complement factor H and conformational implications of disease-linked sequence variations., Hocking HG, Herbert AP, Kavanagh D, Soares DC, Ferreira VP, Pangburn MK, Uhrin D, Barlow PN, J Biol Chem. 2008 Apr 4;283(14):9475-87. Epub 2008 Feb 5. PMID:18252712

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Disease

[CFAH_HUMAN] Genetic variations in CFH are associated with basal laminar drusen (BLD) [MIM:126700]; also known as drusen of Bruch membrane or cuticular drusen or grouped early adult-onset drusen. Drusen are extracellular deposits that accumulate below the retinal pigment epithelium on Bruch membrane. Basal laminar drusen refers to an early adult-onset drusen phenotype that shows a pattern of uniform small, slightly raised yellow subretinal nodules randomly scattered in the macula. In later stages, these drusen often become more numerous, with clustered groups of drusen scattered throughout the retina. In time these small basal laminar drusen may expand and ultimately lead to a serous pigment epithelial detachment of the macula that may result in vision loss. Defects in CFH are the cause of complement factor H deficiency (CFHD) [MIM:609814]. A disorder that can manifest as several different phenotypes, including asymptomatic, recurrent bacterial infections, and renal failure. Laboratory features usually include decreased serum levels of factor H, complement component C3, and a decrease in other terminal complement components, indicating activation of the alternative complement pathway. It is associated with a number of renal diseases with variable clinical presentation and progression, including membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8] Defects in CFH are a cause of susceptibility to hemolytic uremic syndrome atypical type 1 (AHUS1) [MIM:235400]. An atypical form of hemolytic uremic syndrome. It is a complex genetic disease characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, renal failure and absence of episodes of enterocolitis and diarrhea. In contrast to typical hemolytic uremic syndrome, atypical forms have a poorer prognosis, with higher death rates and frequent progression to end-stage renal disease. Note=Susceptibility to the development of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome can be conferred by mutations in various components of or regulatory factors in the complement cascade system. Other genes may play a role in modifying the phenotype.[9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16] Genetic variation in CFH is associated with age-related macular degeneration type 4 (ARMD4) [MIM:610698]. ARMD is a multifactorial eye disease and the most common cause of irreversible vision loss in the developed world. In most patients, the disease is manifest as ophthalmoscopically visible yellowish accumulations of protein and lipid (known as drusen) that lie beneath the retinal pigment epithelium and within an elastin-containing structure known as Bruch membrane.[17]

Function

[CFAH_HUMAN] Factor H functions as a cofactor in the inactivation of C3b by factor I and also increases the rate of dissociation of the C3bBb complex (C3 convertase) and the (C3b)NBB complex (C5 convertase) in the alternative complement pathway.

About this Structure

2rlp is a 1 chain structure with sequence from Homo sapiens. Full experimental information is available from OCA.

Reference

  • Hocking HG, Herbert AP, Kavanagh D, Soares DC, Ferreira VP, Pangburn MK, Uhrin D, Barlow PN. Structure of the N-terminal region of complement factor H and conformational implications of disease-linked sequence variations. J Biol Chem. 2008 Apr 4;283(14):9475-87. Epub 2008 Feb 5. PMID:18252712 doi:10.1074/jbc.M709587200
  1. Ault BH, Schmidt BZ, Fowler NL, Kashtan CE, Ahmed AE, Vogt BA, Colten HR. Human factor H deficiency. Mutations in framework cysteine residues and block in H protein secretion and intracellular catabolism. J Biol Chem. 1997 Oct 3;272(40):25168-75. PMID:9312129
  2. Sanchez-Corral P, Bellavia D, Amico L, Brai M, Rodriguez de Cordoba S. Molecular basis for factor H and FHL-1 deficiency in an Italian family. Immunogenetics. 2000 Apr;51(4-5):366-9. PMID:10803850
  3. Perez-Caballero D, Gonzalez-Rubio C, Gallardo ME, Vera M, Lopez-Trascasa M, Rodriguez de Cordoba S, Sanchez-Corral P. Clustering of missense mutations in the C-terminal region of factor H in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Am J Hum Genet. 2001 Feb;68(2):478-84. Epub 2001 Jan 17. PMID:11170895 doi:S0002-9297(07)64099-3
  4. Richards A, Buddles MR, Donne RL, Kaplan BS, Kirk E, Venning MC, Tielemans CL, Goodship JA, Goodship TH. Factor H mutations in hemolytic uremic syndrome cluster in exons 18-20, a domain important for host cell recognition. Am J Hum Genet. 2001 Feb;68(2):485-90. Epub 2001 Jan 17. PMID:11170896 doi:S0002-9297(07)64100-7
  5. Caprioli J, Bettinaglio P, Zipfel PF, Amadei B, Daina E, Gamba S, Skerka C, Marziliano N, Remuzzi G, Noris M. The molecular basis of familial hemolytic uremic syndrome: mutation analysis of factor H gene reveals a hot spot in short consensus repeat 20. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2001 Feb;12(2):297-307. PMID:11158219
  6. Remuzzi G, Ruggenenti P, Codazzi D, Noris M, Caprioli J, Locatelli G, Gridelli B. Combined kidney and liver transplantation for familial haemolytic uraemic syndrome. Lancet. 2002 May 11;359(9318):1671-2. PMID:12020532 doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(02)08560-4
  7. Dragon-Durey MA, Fremeaux-Bacchi V, Loirat C, Blouin J, Niaudet P, Deschenes G, Coppo P, Herman Fridman W, Weiss L. Heterozygous and homozygous factor h deficiencies associated with hemolytic uremic syndrome or membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis: report and genetic analysis of 16 cases. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2004 Mar;15(3):787-95. PMID:14978182
  8. Licht C, Heinen S, Jozsi M, Loschmann I, Saunders RE, Perkins SJ, Waldherr R, Skerka C, Kirschfink M, Hoppe B, Zipfel PF. Deletion of Lys224 in regulatory domain 4 of Factor H reveals a novel pathomechanism for dense deposit disease (MPGN II). Kidney Int. 2006 Jul;70(1):42-50. Epub 2006 Apr 12. PMID:16612335 doi:10.1038/sj.ki.5000269
  9. Dragon-Durey MA, Fremeaux-Bacchi V, Loirat C, Blouin J, Niaudet P, Deschenes G, Coppo P, Herman Fridman W, Weiss L. Heterozygous and homozygous factor h deficiencies associated with hemolytic uremic syndrome or membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis: report and genetic analysis of 16 cases. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2004 Mar;15(3):787-95. PMID:14978182
  10. Warwicker P, Goodship TH, Donne RL, Pirson Y, Nicholls A, Ward RM, Turnpenny P, Goodship JA. Genetic studies into inherited and sporadic hemolytic uremic syndrome. Kidney Int. 1998 Apr;53(4):836-44. PMID:9551389 doi:10.1111/j.1523-1755.1998.00824.x
  11. Ying L, Katz Y, Schlesinger M, Carmi R, Shalev H, Haider N, Beck G, Sheffield VC, Landau D. Complement factor H gene mutation associated with autosomal recessive atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Am J Hum Genet. 1999 Dec;65(6):1538-46. PMID:10577907 doi:S0002-9297(07)63573-3
  12. Buddles MR, Donne RL, Richards A, Goodship J, Goodship TH. Complement factor H gene mutation associated with autosomal recessive atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Am J Hum Genet. 2000 May;66(5):1721-2. PMID:10762557 doi:10.1086/302877
  13. Perkins SJ, Goodship TH. Molecular modelling of the C-terminal domains of factor H of human complement: a correlation between haemolytic uraemic syndrome and a predicted heparin binding site. J Mol Biol. 2002 Feb 15;316(2):217-24. PMID:11851332 doi:10.1006/jmbi.2001.5337
  14. Caprioli J, Castelletti F, Bucchioni S, Bettinaglio P, Bresin E, Pianetti G, Gamba S, Brioschi S, Daina E, Remuzzi G, Noris M. Complement factor H mutations and gene polymorphisms in haemolytic uraemic syndrome: the C-257T, the A2089G and the G2881T polymorphisms are strongly associated with the disease. Hum Mol Genet. 2003 Dec 15;12(24):3385-95. Epub 2003 Oct 28. PMID:14583443 doi:10.1093/hmg/ddg363
  15. Neumann HP, Salzmann M, Bohnert-Iwan B, Mannuelian T, Skerka C, Lenk D, Bender BU, Cybulla M, Riegler P, Konigsrainer A, Neyer U, Bock A, Widmer U, Male DA, Franke G, Zipfel PF. Haemolytic uraemic syndrome and mutations of the factor H gene: a registry-based study of German speaking countries. J Med Genet. 2003 Sep;40(9):676-81. PMID:12960213
  16. Maga TK, Nishimura CJ, Weaver AE, Frees KL, Smith RJ. Mutations in alternative pathway complement proteins in American patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Hum Mutat. 2010 Jun;31(6):E1445-60. doi: 10.1002/humu.21256. PMID:20513133 doi:10.1002/humu.21256
  17. Raychaudhuri S, Iartchouk O, Chin K, Tan PL, Tai AK, Ripke S, Gowrisankar S, Vemuri S, Montgomery K, Yu Y, Reynolds R, Zack DJ, Campochiaro B, Campochiaro P, Katsanis N, Daly MJ, Seddon JM. A rare penetrant mutation in CFH confers high risk of age-related macular degeneration. Nat Genet. 2011 Oct 23;43(12):1232-6. doi: 10.1038/ng.976. PMID:22019782 doi:10.1038/ng.976

Proteopedia Page Contributors and Editors (what is this?)

OCA

Personal tools