3ghg

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3ghg, resolution 2.90Å ()
Ligands: , , , , ,
Non-Standard Residues:
Related: 1m1j, 1fzc, 1deq, 2a45
Resources: FirstGlance, OCA, RCSB, PDBsum
Coordinates: save as pdb, mmCIF, xml


Contents

Crystal Structure of Human Fibrinogen

Publication Abstract from PubMed

A crystal structure of human fibrinogen has been determined at approximately 3.3 A resolution. The protein was purified from human blood plasma, first by a cold ethanol precipitation procedure and then by stepwise chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. A product was obtained that was homogeneous on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Nonetheless, when individual crystals used for X-ray diffraction were examined by SDS gel electrophoresis after data collection, two species of alpha chain were present, indicating that some proteolysis had occurred during the course of operations. Amino-terminal sequencing on post-X-ray crystals showed mostly intact native alpha- and gamma-chain sequences (the native beta chain is blocked). The overall structure differs from that of a native fibrinogen from chicken blood and those reported for a partially proteolyzed bovine fibrinogen in the nature of twist in the coiled-coil regions, likely due to weak forces imparted by unique crystal packing. As such, the structure adds to the inventory of possible conformations that may occur in solution. Other features include a novel interface with an antiparallel arrangement of beta chains and a unique tangential association of coiled coils from neighboring molecules. The carbohydrate groups attached to beta chains are unusually prominent, the full sweep of 11 sugar residues being positioned. As was the case for native chicken fibrinogen, no resolvable electron density could be associated with alphaC domains.

Crystal structure of human fibrinogen., Kollman JM, Pandi L, Sawaya MR, Riley M, Doolittle RF, Biochemistry. 2009 May 12;48(18):3877-86. PMID:19296670

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Disease

[FIBA_HUMAN] Defects in FGA are a cause of congenital afibrinogenemia (CAFBN) [MIM:202400]. This is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bleeding that varies from mild to severe and by complete absence or extremely low levels of plasma and platelet fibrinogen. Note=The majority of cases of afibrinogenemia are due to truncating mutations. Variations in position Arg-35 (the site of cleavage of fibrinopeptide a by thrombin) leads to alpha-dysfibrinogenemias. Defects in FGA are a cause of amyloidosis type 8 (AMYL8) [MIM:105200]; also known as systemic non-neuropathic amyloidosis or Ostertag-type amyloidosis. AMYL8 is a hereditary generalized amyloidosis due to deposition of apolipoprotein A1, fibrinogen and lysozyme amyloids. Viscera are particularly affected. There is no involvement of the nervous system. Clinical features include renal amyloidosis resulting in nephrotic syndrome, arterial hypertension, hepatosplenomegaly, cholestasis, petechial skin rash.[1] [FIBG_HUMAN] Defects in FGG are a cause of congenital afibrinogenemia (CAFBN) [MIM:202400]. This rare autosomal recessive disorder is characterized by bleeding that varies from mild to severe and by complete absence or extremely low levels of plasma and platelet fibrinogen. Note=Patients with congenital fibrinogen abnormalities can manifest different clinical pictures. Some cases are clinically silent, some show a tendency toward bleeding and some show a predisposition for thrombosis with or without bleeding. [FIBB_HUMAN] Defects in FGB are a cause of congenital afibrinogenemia (CAFBN) [MIM:202400]. This rare autosomal recessive disorder is characterized by bleeding that varies from mild to severe and by complete absence or extremely low levels of plasma and platelet fibrinogen. Note=Patients with congenital fibrinogen abnormalities can manifest different clinical pictures. Some cases are clinically silent, some show a tendency toward bleeding and some show a predisposition for thrombosis with or without bleeding.

Function

[FIBA_HUMAN] Fibrinogen has a double function: yielding monomers that polymerize into fibrin and acting as a cofactor in platelet aggregation. [FIBG_HUMAN] Fibrinogen has a double function: yielding monomers that polymerize into fibrin and acting as a cofactor in platelet aggregation. [FIBB_HUMAN] Fibrinogen has a double function: yielding monomers that polymerize into fibrin and acting as a cofactor in platelet aggregation.

About this Structure

3ghg is a 20 chain structure with sequence from Homo sapiens. Full crystallographic information is available from OCA.

See Also

Reference

  • Kollman JM, Pandi L, Sawaya MR, Riley M, Doolittle RF. Crystal structure of human fibrinogen. Biochemistry. 2009 May 12;48(18):3877-86. PMID:19296670 doi:10.1021/bi802205g
  1. Benson MD, Liepnieks J, Uemichi T, Wheeler G, Correa R. Hereditary renal amyloidosis associated with a mutant fibrinogen alpha-chain. Nat Genet. 1993 Mar;3(3):252-5. PMID:8097946 doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng0393-252

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