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2f8x

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2f8x, resolution 3.25Å ()
Gene: NOTCH1, TAN1 (Homo sapiens), MAML1, KIAA0200 (Homo sapiens)
Resources: FirstGlance, OCA, RCSB, PDBsum
Coordinates: save as pdb, mmCIF, xml


Contents

Crystal structure of activated Notch, CSL and MAML on HES-1 promoter DNA sequence

Publication Abstract from PubMed

Notch receptors transduce essential developmental signals between neighboring cells by forming a complex that leads to transcription of target genes upon activation. We report here the crystal structure of a Notch transcriptional activation complex containing the ankyrin domain of human Notch1 (ANK), the transcription factor CSL on cognate DNA, and a polypeptide from the coactivator Mastermind-like-1 (MAML-1). Together, CSL and ANK create a groove to bind the MAML-1 polypeptide as a kinked, 70 A helix. The composite binding surface likely restricts the recruitment of MAML proteins to promoters on which Notch:CSL complexes have been preassembled, ensuring tight transcriptional control of Notch target genes.

Structural basis for cooperativity in recruitment of MAML coactivators to Notch transcription complexes., Nam Y, Sliz P, Song L, Aster JC, Blacklow SC, Cell. 2006 Mar 10;124(5):973-83. PMID:16530044

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Disease

[NOTC1_HUMAN] Defects in NOTCH1 are a cause of aortic valve disease 1 (AOVD1) [MIM:109730]. A common defect in the aortic valve in which two rather than three leaflets are present. It is often associated with aortic valve calcification and insufficiency. In extreme cases, the blood flow may be so restricted that the left ventricle fails to grow, resulting in hypoplastic left heart syndrome.[1] [SUH_HUMAN] Defects in RBPJ are the cause of Adams-Oliver syndrome 3 (AOS3) [MIM:614814]. An autosomal dominant form of Adams-Oliver syndrome, a disorder characterized by the congenital absence of skin (aplasia cutis congenita) in combination with transverse limb defects. Aplasia cutis congenita can be located anywhere on the body, but in the vast majority of the cases, it is present on the posterior parietal region where it is often associated with an underlying defect of the parietal bones. Limb abnormalities are typically limb truncation defects affecting the distal phalanges or entire digits (true ectrodactyly). Only rarely, metatarsals/metacarpals or more proximal limb structures are also affected. Apart from transverse limb defects, syndactyly, most commonly of second and third toes, can also be observed. The clinical features are highly variable and can also include cardiovascular malformations, brain abnormalities and vascular defects such as cutis marmorata and dilated scalp veins. AOS3 patients manifest characteristic vertex scalp defects and terminal limb defects, but without congenital heart defects, other associated defects, or immune defects.[2]

Function

[NOTC1_HUMAN] Functions as a receptor for membrane-bound ligands Jagged1, Jagged2 and Delta1 to regulate cell-fate determination. Upon ligand activation through the released notch intracellular domain (NICD) it forms a transcriptional activator complex with RBPJ/RBPSUH and activates genes of the enhancer of split locus. Affects the implementation of differentiation, proliferation and apoptotic programs. May be important for normal lymphocyte function. In altered form, may contribute to transformation or progression in some T-cell neoplasms. Involved in the maturation of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells in the thymus. May be important for follicular differentiation and possibly cell fate selection within the follicle. During cerebellar development, may function as a receptor for neuronal DNER and may be involved in the differentiation of Bergmann glia. Represses neuronal and myogenic differentiation. May enhance HIF1A function by sequestering HIF1AN away from HIF1A (By similarity). [SUH_HUMAN] Transcriptional regulator that plays a central role in Notch signaling, a signaling pathway involved in cell-cell communication that regulates a broad spectrum of cell-fate determinations. Acts as a transcriptional repressor when it is not associated with Notch proteins. When associated with some NICD product of Notch proteins (Notch intracellular domain), it acts as a transcriptional activator that activates transcription of Notch target genes. Probably represses or activates transcription via the recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes containing histone deacetylase or histone acetylase proteins, respectively. Specifically binds to the immunoglobulin kappa-type J segment recombination signal sequence. Binds specifically to methylated DNA.[3] [MAML1_HUMAN] Acts as a transcriptional coactivator for NOTCH proteins. Has been shown to amplify NOTCH-induced transcription of HES1. Enhances phosphorylation and proteolytic turnover of the NOTCH intracellular domain in the nucleus through interaction with CDK8. Binds to CREBBP/CBP which promotes nucleosome acetylation at NOTCH enhancers and activates transcription. Induces phosphorylation and localization of CREBBP to nuclear foci. Plays a role in hematopoietic development by regulating NOTCH-mediated lymphoid cell fate decisions.[4][5][6][7][8]

About this Structure

2f8x is a 5 chain structure with sequence from Homo sapiens. Full crystallographic information is available from OCA.

Reference

  • Nam Y, Sliz P, Song L, Aster JC, Blacklow SC. Structural basis for cooperativity in recruitment of MAML coactivators to Notch transcription complexes. Cell. 2006 Mar 10;124(5):973-83. PMID:16530044 doi:10.1016/j.cell.2005.12.037
  1. Garg V, Muth AN, Ransom JF, Schluterman MK, Barnes R, King IN, Grossfeld PD, Srivastava D. Mutations in NOTCH1 cause aortic valve disease. Nature. 2005 Sep 8;437(7056):270-4. Epub 2005 Jul 17. PMID:16025100 doi:10.1038/nature03940
  2. Hassed SJ, Wiley GB, Wang S, Lee JY, Li S, Xu W, Zhao ZJ, Mulvihill JJ, Robertson J, Warner J, Gaffney PM. RBPJ mutations identified in two families affected by Adams-Oliver syndrome. Am J Hum Genet. 2012 Aug 10;91(2):391-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2012.07.005. PMID:22883147 doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2012.07.005
  3. Bartels SJ, Spruijt CG, Brinkman AB, Jansen PW, Vermeulen M, Stunnenberg HG. A SILAC-based screen for Methyl-CpG binding proteins identifies RBP-J as a DNA methylation and sequence-specific binding protein. PLoS One. 2011;6(10):e25884. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0025884. Epub 2011 Oct 3. PMID:21991380 doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0025884
  4. Wu L, Aster JC, Blacklow SC, Lake R, Artavanis-Tsakonas S, Griffin JD. MAML1, a human homologue of Drosophila mastermind, is a transcriptional co-activator for NOTCH receptors. Nat Genet. 2000 Dec;26(4):484-9. PMID:11101851 doi:10.1038/82644
  5. Kitagawa M, Oyama T, Kawashima T, Yedvobnick B, Kumar A, Matsuno K, Harigaya K. A human protein with sequence similarity to Drosophila mastermind coordinates the nuclear form of notch and a CSL protein to build a transcriptional activator complex on target promoters. Mol Cell Biol. 2001 Jul;21(13):4337-46. PMID:11390662 doi:10.1128/MCB.21.13.4337-4346.2001
  6. Fryer CJ, Lamar E, Turbachova I, Kintner C, Jones KA. Mastermind mediates chromatin-specific transcription and turnover of the Notch enhancer complex. Genes Dev. 2002 Jun 1;16(11):1397-411. PMID:12050117 doi:10.1101/gad.991602
  7. Fryer CJ, White JB, Jones KA. Mastermind recruits CycC:CDK8 to phosphorylate the Notch ICD and coordinate activation with turnover. Mol Cell. 2004 Nov 19;16(4):509-20. PMID:15546612 doi:S1097276504006409
  8. Zhao Y, Katzman RB, Delmolino LM, Bhat I, Zhang Y, Gurumurthy CB, Germaniuk-Kurowska A, Reddi HV, Solomon A, Zeng MS, Kung A, Ma H, Gao Q, Dimri G, Stanculescu A, Miele L, Wu L, Griffin JD, Wazer DE, Band H, Band V. The notch regulator MAML1 interacts with p53 and functions as a coactivator. J Biol Chem. 2007 Apr 20;282(16):11969-81. Epub 2007 Feb 22. PMID:17317671 doi:M608974200

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